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Tag Archives: 3 stars

The Heist by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg

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 the heist

Ah a new series by Janet Evanovich, co-authored by Lee Goldberg. I’m happy to report that this series seems far more promising than Evanovich’s Lizzy & Diesel one. O’Hare, a FBI agent, has been chasing Fox, a con man, for years and she finally catches the bastard. But now O’Hare’s boss wants her to team up with Fox to catch a bad guy the FBI just can’t nab thanks to some pesky laws. Wackiness ensues as they try to put together a team that will help them catch their mark.

This book had the typical romantic male lead, Fox, totally overstepping his bounds. Fox likes to push O’Hare’s buttons, one way he does this is to Facebook stalk her sister and then talk to O’Hare about what he saw…because that’s not creepy. This isn’t written as a horror novel, it’s a romantic comedy so Facebook stalking is considered cute and endearing.

Don’t get me wrong creepy, stalker romantic lead aside this book is laugh out loud funny. This is why I keep coming back to Evanovich’s books. I am able to get past the semi-fleshed out characters, casual sexism, racism and misogyny because the books are stupid funny. None of these flaws are too blatant to drag you out of the book to vent on a social media site, but if you expected a book with Evanovich’s name on the cover to be sort of progressive sorry, you won’t find that here.  I always wonder what happened to Evanvich to be so obsessed with food and big breasted women, if anyone knows can you fill me in? One day, when I want to get trashed, I’m going to make a drinking game out how frequently she mentions food in a negative way and talks about her big breasted characters breasts.

O’Hare is supposed to be a top FBI agent and ex-Navy Seal but I have a hard time believing that. She seems fairly helpless and unable to adapt to changes quickly, although, she doesn’t shy away from a physically altercation. O’Hare has the same blind stubbornness as Stephanie Plum but is a lot better at rescuing herself.

I can’t read too many of Evanovich’s books too quickly or the fact that she has a standard blueprint for all of her books gets to me, but on the days when I need to laugh I don’t mind grabbing one of her books off my shelf.

Does it pass the Bechdel test?

Yes

Triggers

No known

Final Rating:

gold-star (1)gold-star (1)gold-star (1)

A Dark Dividing

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a dark dividing

 

A Dark Dividing by is Sarah Rayne is a gothic mystery spanning over 80 years.  It has a multiple POV, which jumps back and forth though time. The book introduces us to Henry, a down on his luck reporter to do an in depth article on a photographer, Simone Anderson. Henry’s article isn’t on her photography though but on her twin sister and mysterious mother.

The most interesting character was Charlotte, if the whole book had been about her I would have loved it. None of the people are really the main characters, its Mortmain House, an old workhouse and orphanage. All of the characters end up here at one point or another.  The scenes in Mortmain house are supposed to be most suspenseful and scariest but they just didn’t quite cut it.

It starts out strong but about halfway through I was just waiting for it to end. The last 50 or so pages drew me back in. There is supposed to be some horror in the story but when it appears it’s pretty mild. I’m disappointed I didn’t like this book more. It had great potential but it really couldn’t hold my attention.  This was the first book I’ve ever read by Sarah Rayne so I think I’ll give her another chance.

 

Trigger Warnings:

Slurs

Child Molestation

Rape

Sexual Assault

Does it pass the Bechdel test?

Yes

Final Rating:

gold-star (1)gold-star (1)gold-star (1)

 

 

 

 

Kindness Goes Unpunished

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Kindness-Goes-Unpunished

 

 

Kindness Goes Unpunished by Craig Johnson is the third book in his Longmire series.  Walt accompanies Henry to Philadelphia, where Henry is giving a lecture Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.  Walt’s reason’s for going aren’t entirely to support Henry and keep him company, Walt’s daughter Cady lives there.  The first few pages will make anyone who has ever had to deal with children laugh out loud. Walt is trying to read a fairy tale to a room of children and it’s not going well, “My daddy hides his medicine whenever anybody knocks on our door…He says he doesn’t have a prescription…He smokes his medicine.” (p. 3) Shortly after Walt and Henry arrive in Philadelphia Cady is attacked and barely survives.

A good portion of this book is spent on Walt and Henry’s love for Cady. You can feel their raw pain and confusion about what to do. And though this is a vital part of the story and could have easily be dragged out to the point of losing its potency, Johnson doesn’t do that.

The setting of this series is as important as the people, Wyoming almost feels like another character. This book doesn’t take place in Wyoming though, it takes place in Philadelphia. I wasn’t sure if Johnson would be able to hold onto the magic if he moved Walt to a city. I don’t know why I was worried. Walt’s not some country bumpkin, he’s traveled the world but I still didn’t expect him to do as well as he did. Walt being in city doesn’t change him, he still wears his cowboy hat and boots, so he stands out a bit more than back home.

We also are introduced to Moretti’s family. It’s easy to see where she gets her no nonsense attitude.

Spoiler time: It comes out in the book that Cady is in an abusive relationship and while I hate that she is in one, I love the way Johnson wrote it. Cady is described as a strong, independent, intelligent, and well-loved woman.  Normally when we are introduced to a woman in an abusive relationship these women are the exact opposite of Cady, and are so desperate for love that they’ll take whatever they can get even if it leaves bruises. Those women are only one part of victims of domestic violence and women like Cady are often seen as too smart to “get themselves” into a situation like that but that’s not reality. All women from all walks of life are venerable to an abusive relationship. Johnson doesn’t condemn Cady for this though we and by default, Walt, are directed to take our anger for this out on her abuser (which is where it belongs.)

 

Trigger Warnings:

Animal Death

Abuse

Does it pass the Bechdel test?

No

Final Rating:

gold-star (1)gold-star (1)gold-star (1)